Skip to main content

About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
CNBC 17
CSPAN2 4
CNNW 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
KICU 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> right now, the european union is in distress. what would a failed euro mean for the e.u. or for its largest trading partner, the u.s.? >> the '08/'09 financial panic/crash/great recession put tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has n
for the river and an island for the city. >> 1 trillion euros -- that's roughly how much the eu countries lose every year to tax evasion. brussels is not amused, not least because the euro crisis is far from over. now europe is looking f ways to more effectively track down and penalize tax dodgers. in italy, tax collecting is done by the finance police, the guardia de finanza. employees often used dubious methods when chasing down tax defaulters. the tax collectors work on commission. the more people they catch, the better for them. that is putting pressure on ordinary italians, especially sml and medium-ze cpani. >> it was a spectacular protest against italy's new tax laws. the owner of a small beach bar scaled the dome of st. peter's basilica in rome and stayed put for some 24 hours. when he climbed back down, he was greeted by a cheering crowd. [applause] >> i really hope this tax issue is resolved soon and our small businesses as well as the whole economy can pick up again, at least a little. >> the tax measures by italy's technocrat government under the prime minister are another weapon i
a poll in frons show those in the uk would prefer to leave the eu. we are waiting on the results from italy's latest debt auction. it will be two years of a zero coupon and five years of an italian linked paper. we'll get the results coming up in just a moment. here is a check of the european markets. we have seen them particular to the upside. now with the exception of spain trying to fight back into the green this morning, bolstered basically by the general risk on attitude. perhaps some of the credit flows, some of the equity fund flows boosting stock markets around the world. here is a look at who is leading the index this morning. onte paschi is on the top of the board, up 6.35%. today it's continued to snap back on hopes of.continued investor returnings. asml, elements which help make computer chips is up about 4%. it has been upgraded. it's viewed as a winner here in the mobile phone wars as more continue to shift to that market. sbm offshore, peugeot, tnt express towards top of the pack. at the bottom, it's a different story. down 3.5% o a downgrade, some other companies there
david cameron promises to hold a referendum on the e.u. warning that a concession for the democratic leadership is wafer thin. >> if we don't address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >>> google could light a fire under u.s. markets today as the giant's fourth quarter profits top forecasts on higher ad revenues. >>> and here in davos, bank ceos fight back against regulators in an exclusive cnbc debate, apologizing to scandals of the past but defiant it the role of the industry. >> i think there's so much misinformation out there that's used aggressively by people for their own purposes. we provide a service to you. we make a little money every time we do it. that's what happens. >>> and ceo confidence down for a third year in a row according to a survey here. despite markets hitting multiyear highs with lack of decisions in the u.s. weighing on sentiment. >>> okay, hello and welcome to the start of our coverage from the annual meeting of the world economic forum here in davos. day one of three come. kelly, i could
of there being a straight referendum on being an in/out referendum, part of the eu, not part of the eu, which is mixed from where most people think they are. >> some of the surveys show the people becoming more worried about it and we saw those comments, what's his face, labor leader over the weekend saying that he's walking out of the eurozone. so clearly, he finds that there's political gain to be made from -- >> and then you saw this british train commerce survey, just 26% of them wanted to keep the status quo, right? >> i thought this was extraordinary. i was surprises how low it is. in this survey, when you ask businesses about how much in favor they are of keeping things the same, only 24%. >> 59% wanted a looser relationship with the eurozone. most people would say, we want to stay part of the eu, but we would like to have far less regulation, far less judgments than just have been contemplated from the european court. >> is britain going to be able to say that where they get rid of the regulation and teen the market and all that? >> that's the number one question. >> and we will explo
of a couple in the last year to syria when the e.u.'s embargo changed, the provisions of that changed and so, i think those are advantages. >> thank you. >> mike gates. >> can you confirm in the case of an agreement between the u.k. and another government perhaps some kind of defense cooperation that doesn't have the same status as the, where we are talking about restrictions or controls on the arms exports that are purchased from british companies or exported from this country? in other words, if the mod decides to transfer equipment to another state that wouldn't be subjected to the same criteria as would apply with regards to the armed export regime? . . >> if you have further information; that would be helpful. okay. that's fine. can i ask you about the review as regards the workload that you referred to for ministers, the number of items for consideration: you said thorough overseeing of ministers went up 235 this year compared to 153 last year and 39 in the previous year before your middle east and north africa review. >> right. >> this is presumably dealt with by the human rights sect
results in europe look set for a change. the eu muniea explains his investigation into the search engine. he's convinced google is profiting by diverting internet traffic for certain businesses. >>> american skres announced better-than-expected earnings for the fourth quarter. it saw revenues of $8.4 had billion. it will make big restructuring changes which includes 5,400 job cuts throughout the quarter. shares dipped in extended hours of trading the. >>> and the fate of superman remains firmly with warner brothers and dc comics after a decision from a california court. the court of appeals said that the rights for the man of appeals should not stay with the cocreators. the decision means that warner can release this summer's new superman reboot without fear of legal challenges. so we're watching today. who is your favorite hee roar? superman, ironman, super mario draghi? whoever you like, e-mail us, tweet us. my produces asked me who i thought my favorite super hero was. it took my a while to think about it, but then i thought hong kong fooey. there you go. many happy memories. talking
britain should leave the e.u. and what that would mean. that has a lot of people talking here about the implications for the u.k., for europe. whether -- we had this big discussion about new york versus london. what happens to the banking system. what happens to the financial? that is the u.k. that's become a big i issue. let's bring in a good friend, as i said, of "squawk." bob hormatz, you know him well. a new -- not a fancy new title, but you're the under secretary of state for economic growth, energy, and the environment. that changed a year ago? >> yes, we tried to pull these together. increasingly what happens in the economy has an impact on the environment. environmental issues and energy issues are increasingly intertwined. >> always big in davos. and david cameron, it has an impact on the global economy if this were to go forward. the chances of it going forward i think are small. he has to get re-elected in 2015 to propose the up or down vote in 2017. it does put a cloud over the u.k. and e.u. a bit. >> the u.s. view has been not to get involved in u.s. politics. the u.s.
for military operations against the militants. the imf and the eu already pledged money to support the beleaguered economy. i jubilation and towns across northern mali. people here know how fragile of their security is. the militants may have vanished for now and the desert, but any sign of weakness and they could return. few relished the prospect of a long guerrilla war. >> let's get the latest live from timbuktu. tom went into timbuktu with the troops and he joins us live. the islamist rebels out of sight but not out of mind? >> exactly. they are believed to be hiding in surrounding desert. but i can tell you the tension is rising here in timbuktu. there are scenes of looting downtown, with dozens of people out in the streets going one shop after the other, targeting shops that were held by ethnic touraregs. accusing them of collaborating with ms -- islamists and they say they are hiding arms, cash, and weapons. the malian army deployed in town, and is trying to contain the crowd, although it is not clear because there also kind of smiling and waving at the crowd. they have pulle
as the eu politics are, they're on their way to unified banking regulation in the eurozone. their crisis fund has stabilized. it's not going to be pretty and it's going to take a couple of years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu, with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> a little bit too positive to me. i would say europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. i think the reason it probably won't come apart is greece, not france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. but for germany, it's one thing if greece were to leave, but for france, it can't leave. if you're germany, that's the whole core, the whole concept, the dynamic of post-world war ii european integration. germany will go to great lengths, i think really whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, it's still going to be extremely weak because it doesn't have in place a
the bailout. that was an incredible show of will. halting and clumsy and awkward as the eu politics are, they're on the way to banking regulation in the euro zone. it's not going to be pretty and it's going to take a couple years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> too positive to me. europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. the reason it probably won't come together is not greece, it's france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. france can't leave if you're germany because that's the whole core, the whole dynamic. the relationship. germany will go to great lengths, really, whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, still extremely weak because it doesn't have in place any of the prerequisites. >> the head of morgan stanley had a piece where he said that europe is actually going to bounce
, the eu debt crisis and superstorm sandy are expected to top issues. take a look at shares this morning. before the report, they're down .75% in frankfurt. so trailing the 34k9. they have been roughly flat over the last few months. james is a huge fan of werings season. you're so excited about this one, i know. >> i live for the wering hes season. you could spend almost your entire time -- >> there's only about three months of the year when you're not engaged in looking at earnings. >> ask you're probably on holiday. >> and are we too focused on werings season? >> samsung, earnings results up, share price down. if you think earnings is relative for share price performance, it isn't. we're talking about the reporting season rather than the underlying earnings. >> they have quite a lot of leeway. they've given guidance to the analysts about what those earnings might look like in the near term. all the analysts are pawing at the results. all in all, a huge amount of activity and brain power wasted on something which in the near term has been well flagged, isn't that important. >> at the sa
around the world. social democrats take control of the house and the eu is forced out of power in lower saxony. plus, optimism by the u.s. as republicans attempt to break the budget stalemate in congress. investors pulling back in japan as the boj begins its two-day meeting that's widely expected to back more easing and a new 2% inflation target. >>> and heavy snow bringing travel across northern europe. hundreds of flights canceled here in the uk. france and germany, too, with disruptions expected to continue for several days. >> yes. welcome to "worldwide exchange." ross westgate is away. he will be back later in the week from davos and along with plenty of other people and a lot of great guests. it's a three-hour program. the first three hours, i think the third you'll have to flip over to cnbc to catch. we will be heading out to washington as the capital prepares for the inauguration of president barack obama. but will he spend the next four years at the mercy of republicans? we'll explore that. plus, we'll assess if israel could be medicining for a right coalition as benjamin netan
chancellor merkel certainly wanted to keep in the e.u. because they never went into the eurozone. but they are an active member of the e.u.. she wants to keep them in. >> time is getting a little tight here, so let's go to two questions very quickly. right here and then right over here. >> do you think it would enhance economic opportunities in asia if we had more asian members of congress? >> that's an interesting thought. of course, some very senior members of congress, in fact, the senior senator just died who, inouye, who had tremendous clout there. and you're seeing more and or more asian members elected, male and female. and i think you'll continue to see that. you know -- >> who else -- [inaudible] >> well, you have, i think there are several. you have one who's a korean, i think you have one korean-american, and i think you'll see more going forward because you've got a lot of asian americans who are mayors, you know, in major cities. and i think that the answer is i think would be very helpful to have more asian-americans as members of congress. and, of course, you had g
by manipulating internet searches. the e.u. says its probe continues. if found guilty, the search giant could be fined billions of dollars. and it's an etf free-for-all. exchange traded funds are becoming the investor's choice over mutual funds. data for the first 11 months of last year show 10's of billions of dollars more were poured into the lower-fee funds. nearly $120 billion was taken out of stock funds, while etfs' total amount climbed to $154 billion. it was a banner week for the first week of the year. is dan haugh of pti securities cashing in and heading to hawaii? > > well, it seems that way. we certainly had a good week. the iwm, the russell 2000, went up 5 3/4% in a four day week. so that is a pretty good week last week. > were you a little surprised at the gains, particularly after the thursday softness in the markets? > > really when you had the activity in washington finally being somewhat resolved, even though the majority of it, most of the negative things are to- be-continued, you knew that there was going to be a relief rally of some sort. but realistically, this has gone
early to say. i think the eu has taken action, the situation is much more stabilized, uncertainties have reduced. so i think we are on the right path for further growth. >> it's going to be a reasonably good year. if you exclude europe, i would say it's going to be a good year for the industry, but when you include europe, it's going to be exceptionally good. we are looking at the car market with the construction of 8%. we are protecting 3% of construction for 2013. i don't think in europe we are still in the recovery mode. except europe, growth everywhere. >> you see the different twist or europe in particular dpifg more stability. it's about combining different disabilities to reboost growth. >> all right. the final quote there coming back little by little, maria. >> yeah. a big diversified group of executives talking about the environment. joining us right now is the ceo of coca-cola, muhtar. it's great to see you. >> great to see you. >> what do you think? >> well, we continue to see opportunities everywhere in the world, the kind of opportunities are continuing to contract the code
's going to do a referendum on whether or not to keep the uk in the eu. what would be the implications if the eu has left? >> i think we are still quite far from that happening. of course, this announcement of a referendum years from now is creating uncertainty and is not necessarily helpful in terms of stabilizing the economy, neither in the uk or in the european union. >> do you think changes need to be made in terms of policies to encourage the uk to stay? >> in fact, many of the elements or the policy agenda of david cameron are something which are very important and the commission is working for the confidence of european industry, a rather comprehensive free trade agenda as well as the competition of the single market. this beneath for restoration of the european industry and of returning to sustainable growth and better employment. but there is no need to leave the european union for the policy -- >> this morning, as you well know, the foreign affairs and trade, as well, there's quite a lot of support around europe for david cameron's thought process of what he wants to achieve
in the motor race, though. we've had a big eu change on the agenda. >> yeah. >> we don't know how that's going to come out in the wash, do we? >> that changes things around. but in the short-term, it does mean that the markets are a little more volatile and it has been a sizable change. >> it's just unfortunate to some degree that these natural disasters which affect many people and are stressful events to live through then cause insurance premium toes rise, which sounds like that's what's happening in part of the u.s. >> it varies, but long-term insurers will look to make profit over a period of time. when they do happen, they have to look at have they been in line with all their expectations? >> and what's happening with capacity? it's dictated by capacity levels. >> yeah. pnc, capital comes in and out frequently been we are seeing money coming into the insurance sector. as capacity comes in, rates will go down. >> i want to talk about life, but first to cap off what happened with superstorm sandy, it took a while to get a sense of how costly that event was. what's emerging? >> i think most
. in the u.k., this big e.u. debate about how important is european trade in the future, as well. you've also been speaking to the prime minister of latvia. what does he have to say? >> reporter:. latvia is a poster child, isn't it, for those on the right economically if you like who think that austerity and paying dunn your debts is the way that you restore growth. latvia had a very difficult crisis. they had negative growth and a contraction of the economy of somewhere around 20%. last year, they grew 5%. this year they're expected to grow 3.5%. and that's because they front loaded a lot of the cuts in government spending, and they forced down wage rates. i caught up with the latvian prime minister earlier this morning on "squawk box" and said, well, you've done it, greece, spain, italy, portugal, perhaps they should be learning lessons from you. let's listen to how he responded. >> i wouldn't go as far as now to tell exactly other countries what should be -- what they should be doing because each country has its own difficulties and its own way out of the crisis. but in general, we see tha
and something about the world. did you see this poster from the e.u. showing all of the symbols of the euro? it showed a cross, star of david and so on and a hammer and sickle. there is a bit of an outcry from the lithuanians. and i ask why does it take the lithuanians, why aren't we in the west sympathetic enough to the persecuted under communism to object ourselves? white -- why would we leave it to them? i am relaxed about these symbols. we see a guy what they cccp with hammers and sickles and i once did a study on this on a simple magazine piece and some people say it's proof. it's kind of funny. you know, you don't see the pictures on t-shirts. it's just a t-shirt. as andrew daniels points out if we only took one good picture in this life he looks like a moon star and he got his cheekbones just right but it wasn't all that much, honestly. this is all regarding chambers, but he was a witness and a truth teller and it was really hard for him to forsake not popular approval but the approval of the people that mattered was colleagues and journalism and what we might call the liberal establ
saying you're special, but only special if you stay at the heart of the eu. they're under pressure to renegotiation the relationship with brussels. but the u.s. assistant secretary said such a plan would have major consequences. as chairman of the business in europe outlined on cnbc last night. >> we don't want to run the risk of trying to set the bar too high in the sense that there's some fantastic renegotiation we can have where we can cherry pick the bits we like, get rid of the bits we don't, because the chances of that happening are probably close to zero. so we don't want to see any risk in our membership. we want more reform by absolutely we do. we made that very clear in the letter. but we don't want to risk or membership because our membership is responsible for millions of jobs and underpins our future prosperity. >> so that debate is going to em. at the same time, david, you think the pound is going to come under pressure. it's a triple cocktail that's going to undermine it. what is that? >> yeah. that's the idea we had, we were talking last year about europe rate cuts,
. reports say the action was taken on concerns was not complied to comply with eu safeguards against money laundering. the vatican is now looking for a non-italian bank to help with card services. they did not comment on the bank of italy's concerns. i'm assuming that the vatican is notre dame supporters, as well. >>> meanwhile, the countdown is on the u.s. jobs report. plenty more to come on "worldwide exchange" right after this break. >>> so naturally the jobs report will demand the bulk of the spotlight for investors. there are some other xhb reports out this morning. the nonfarm payroll reports out at 8:30 eastern. then we go the ism services index released at 10:00 a.m. eastern, looking for an index of 55.4 down from november. also at 10:00, we get november factory orders. janet yellen speaks about systemic risks at the annual meeting of the economics association at 3:30 p.m. futures are atlanta at the moment indicating a flat start but, of course, the open after the report that implied open for the s&p for what it's worth up .2 points for the s&p 500, dow jones is down 7 and fass dak
that they then find a solution presented to brussels and basically present the rest of the eurozone or the eu with a -- do you think this criticism is justified? >> certainly this is a point of criticism that's made outside of germany and france but that's made inside germany and france. some politicians frmt call for widening of the partnerships such as poll left-hand looking towards the east or spain or italy. even more so in the french population. there's a call of widening this partnership. as i've said, france and germany often do have contradictory policy positions. so other countries can really find themselves within these positions, i think. so at the end of the day, it's not so much i think a question of content, but rather a question of style. so what germany and france need to make sure is that they do show leadership, as i've said, to their political and economic weight, but they do find the balance between leadership and dominance because surely dominance is not what either of the two countries or any country in europe would want. >> lead but don't -- >> back to you. >> thank you
cameron speaking this morning. does that have any impact on your business? >> it does in a way. because u.s./eu trade is the one trade agreement that the u.s. has not done. that the europeans desperately need to get done. >> right. so the uk being part of that yes or no i would venture to say our government is going to have a lot to stay about the uk staying part of the eu i think as has been indicated. >> did you catch any of the comments about tax avoidance, sort of global tax avoidance issue? >> no, i did not. i'll stay quiet on that one. >> the other big topic here, energy. >> yes. >> and in particular, the u.s. energy situation, shale, fracking, et cetera, you bullish, you bearish, where do you think we really are? i mean people have prognosticated for now awhile that we were going to get there but doesn't seem like we're there. >> andrew, i think it is the bull case for the world. so to answer your question, i'm billish. and i think it's a game changer. and i think it is probably the story of global economic recovery if handled right. and frankly, the beneficiaries of that will be the u.s
growth. recovery under the spotlight. it takes on the rotating presidency of the e.u. steve spoke to the country's deputy prime minister and asked about dublin's plans to exit the e.u./imf support program and the chances of ireland brokering a budget deal during its pregnancy. >> it was disappointing the agreement wasn't reached in november. the president is proceeding with having discussions with member states. we expect that in and around february or certainly the early part of the year that there may be new proposals for a european budget for the next seven years. i think it's important that the european union has a budget that is fit for purpose. member states have given the european union a lot of additional competences over the past number of years. and it's important that we have a budget which is capable of delivering on those. and in particular, delivering on the initiatives that the european union needs to take to get the european economy to grow, to create jobs. areas like research, for example, the common agriculture policy. these are areas that need financial support
cameron vowing a referendum on whether britain remains in the eu. in japan, longest losing streak in two months. china awaits data, that's out tonight. the road map in the u.s. starts off at the golden arches. u.s. same-store sales up 9% for mcdonald's, helped by the dollar menu and mcrib. >> ibm and google surging premarket. google gets its price target raised by six firms this morning on better than expected earnings. >> coach getting pummeled this morning, blaming its big earnings miss on weakness in north america during the holidays. it says it is transforming itself into a lifestyle brand. >> apple's results tonight after the bell. could this be the quarter that marks the bottom on the stock. will tim cook talk about the next omg product in the pipeline. >>> we'll start with mcdonald's. it earned 1.38 nds the fourth quarter, it exceeded estimates. ceo don thompson said for the near term, mcdonald's expects top and bottom line growth to remain under pressure with january global comp sales expected to be negative. jim, it's come a long way since the mid-80s here. still pressure on mar
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)